Lindisfarne Gospels

February 27th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

 

17th Century Italian Sketchbook on Military Art (Part 1)

February 20th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Sketch book of Jedediah Hotchkiss, Captain and Topographical Engineer, Headquarters, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia (1862-65)

February 16th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Click on the image to get right stuck into the detail…

 

Allain Manesson Mallet (1630 -1706)

February 16th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Simplicissimus – Hitler

February 13th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“The Hitler Process (or) How Kahr Saved the Fatherland” – Protector, immediately arrest the arsonist up there! (17th March 1924)

“The 1st of April” – Hitlers entry to Berlin (1st April 1924 APRIL FOOLS DAY)

“The National Group” – The bloody battle-ax, like the savage, He swung before Mathilden, Which is attached to him as a wife, (As long as she is not the man!) In the fair union of blonder souls, The Hitler girl can not be missing: Heil Adolf, start your genius! The Jew’s head brought to him for his breakfast! (1928)

“Adolf, a disabled dictator” – I would be just as good as Mussolini – but the authorities will not allow it! (22nd April 1929)

“From the National Socialist picture Bible” – I am the Adolf, your only Hitler, you shall have no (Gregor) Strasser next to me (28th July 1930)

“The Hunt for Happiness” (22nd September 1930)

“Hitler, the Nationalmarxist” – Adolf, Adolf! Give the Sozi’s my theory again” (10th November 1930)

“Tausend – Hitler – Weissenberg” – When a people is abandoned by all the good gods, there must be new gods! (23rd February 1931)

“Party Discipline” – And even if half of the party went to the devil – as long as my half of the horse remains, nothing will happen to me! (21st April 1931)

“The ideal solution: A collective president” – To represent the Wilhelm Hugenberg replacement, presenting the steel Duesterberg, and to play the mechanical loudspeaker and drums, Hitler (13th March 1932)

“The Prussian eagle at the fitting” – ‘ For the spring only the brown shirt, the last scream!’ ‘A very impossible piece of clothing! How should I stir my wings?’ (24th April 1932)

“Hail Prussians!” – In my state, everyone can be saved, only after my fashion (façon)! (15th May 1932)

“Adolf Barbarossa” – And since the evil ravens, still flying forever, so he has to drum, and conjour up many years (21st August 1932)

“Dangerous Condition” – Everyone wants to stick to the constitution – as long as they get it! (25th September 1932)

“Unanimity” – “Why do we actually have 27 parties? The other 26 are superfluous!” (30th October 1932)

“Always his struggle – never for you work and bread” – Away with Hermann! Adolf belongs in the Teutoburg Forest! He succeeded in beating a sixty million people with only 6000 people from Lippe-Detmold! (5th February 1933).

This last one was published less than a week after the Nazi seizure of power, with Hitler appointed the Chancellorship by President von Hindenburg. The illustration refers to ‘Hermann’ in the Teutoburg forest, which is a monument to Arminius, a 1st century Germanic chieftan, who helped to win a famous victory over the Romans in 9AD. The monument was made in 1875, and served as a focal point for the Nazi’s. The artist has depicted Hitler in place of Arminius, who is seen to have achieved a greater feat, by winning a hugely symbolic, if not numerically impressive election victory in the area (Lippe Detmold) that the statue is situated. Goebbels wrote in his diary after a visit to the monument on 12th January “Here we will again win a battle and will then proceed to a new offensive and continue to win victory upon victory. We have overcome our stagnation. Final victory lies ahead.” After January 15th 1933, following the election victory, the Nazis were in a greater position to exert pressure on the cabinet and the President to appoint Hitler as Chancellor. Not long after this publication, apparently the offices of Simplicissimus were visited by stormtroopers, and there were no more critical cartoons of Hitler to appear in the magazine.

Simplicissimus – Benito Mussolini

February 8th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“Vesuvius Mussolini” – Poor Italy! Again and again you are threatened by volcanic eruptions (1st March 1926)

“Dictatorship Dusk” – Mussolini has forbidden Italians macaroni. Woe to him! (20th September 1926)

“Mussolini the Triumphant” – Only when all my opponents are in prison will I rule over a truly free Italian state (1925)

“Distributed pain is a double pain” – I am sovereign, he is sovereign – so we are both half and half sovereign (3rd June 1929)

“Simple Week” Around Mussolini – (1) Nobody is allowed to laugh about Italy except the eternally blue sky! (2) You photograph me! At least I do not want to spoil it with the Pope. (3) I want the Maccaroni to be sent as a fascia. (4) How did it start with Caligula Professor? (1926)

“Spiritual Advancement” – Benito, Benito – what makes you start a war without my blessing? (30th April 1928)

And it moves – but backwards! (4th March 1929)

“The People” – Processions help against earthquakes – but against Mussolini – -? (1926)

 

Joan of Arc

February 7th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

As seen through the eyes of Schiller, George Bernard Shaw, Frank Wedekind, Hermann Bahr (?), Oscar Wilde and ‘Film’. As illustrated in ‘Simplicissimus’.

The Chaldean Account of Genesis

January 27th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

The Chaldean Account of Genesis (1872) was written by George Smith, who translated the original tablets. The story makes up part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, and describes the Great Flood a good while before it is believed the Book of Genesis was written. Some of the images are from sculptures in the British Museum.

Russian WW1 Lubok

January 26th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“53 Stations of the Tōkaidō as Potted Landscapes” – Utagawa Yoshishige (1848)

January 5th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

The Tokaido is one of a number of roads linking Edo with the rest of Japan. It runs along the Pacific coast to Kyoto. The ’53 stations’ are resting points along the way. In 1832 the artist Utagawa Hiroshige began the first of a number of print series, which depicted the resting points, and these became very popular in Japan (one series becoming apparently the best selling ‘ukiyo-e‘ of all time). The prints in this post are by a different artist, Utagawa Yoshishige, and depict a series of actual potted landscapes (saikei and bonkeimade by a man called Kimura Tōsen. So these prints are based on small sculptures, which were inspired by prints, which were inspired by a walk, made possible by a road. You can see all 53 of the prints and the book here.

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