Simplicissimus – Benito Mussolini

February 8th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“Vesuvius Mussolini” – Poor Italy! Again and again you are threatened by volcanic eruptions (1st March 1926)

“Dictatorship Dusk” – Mussolini has forbidden Italians macaroni. Woe to him! (20th September 1926)

“Mussolini the Triumphant” – Only when all my opponents are in prison will I rule over a truly free Italian state (1925)

“Distributed pain is a double pain” – I am sovereign, he is sovereign – so we are both half and half sovereign (3rd June 1929)

“Simple Week” Around Mussolini – (1) Nobody is allowed to laugh about Italy except the eternally blue sky! (2) You photograph me! At least I do not want to spoil it with the Pope. (3) I want the Maccaroni to be sent as a fascia. (4) How did it start with Caligula Professor? (1926)

“Spiritual Advancement” – Benito, Benito – what makes you start a war without my blessing? (30th April 1928)

And it moves – but backwards! (4th March 1929)

“The People” – Processions help against earthquakes – but against Mussolini – -? (1926)

 

Joan of Arc

February 7th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

As seen through the eyes of Schiller, George Bernard Shaw, Frank Wedekind, Hermann Bahr (?), Oscar Wilde and ‘Film’. As illustrated in ‘Simplicissimus’.

The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) – Carl Dreyer

February 3rd, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Aerial Photography of Fife

February 1st, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Sumerian Scrolls

January 27th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

The Chaldean Account of Genesis

January 27th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

The Chaldean Account of Genesis (1872) was written by George Smith, who translated the original tablets. The story makes up part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, and describes the Great Flood a good while before it is believed the Book of Genesis was written. Some of the images are from sculptures in the British Museum.

Russian WW1 Lubok

January 26th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“53 Stations of the Tōkaidō as Potted Landscapes” – Utagawa Yoshishige (1848)

January 5th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

The Tokaido is one of a number of roads linking Edo with the rest of Japan. It runs along the Pacific coast to Kyoto. The ’53 stations’ are resting points along the way. In 1832 the artist Utagawa Hiroshige began the first of a number of print series, which depicted the resting points, and these became very popular in Japan (one series becoming apparently the best selling ‘ukiyo-e‘ of all time). The prints in this post are by a different artist, Utagawa Yoshishige, and depict a series of actual potted landscapes (saikei and bonkeimade by a man called Kimura Tōsen. So these prints are based on small sculptures, which were inspired by prints, which were inspired by a walk, made possible by a road. You can see all 53 of the prints and the book here.

Book Review – “Everything to Nothing” Geert Buelens (2015)

October 20th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

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Yes. It’s an interesting way of looking at the 1st World War. To be honest though, I would have liked a bit more poetry, and a bit more discussion about the structure and formal effectiveness of that poetry. To be shown just how much of an everyday cultural integer poetry once was is a revelation to me.

Fragment eines Gefäßes (Fragments of Vessels)

October 16th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

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