Simplicissimus – Hitler

February 13th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“The Hitler Process (or) How Kahr Saved the Fatherland” – Protector, immediately arrest the arsonist up there! (17th March 1924)

“The 1st of April” – Hitlers entry to Berlin (1st April 1924 APRIL FOOLS DAY)

“The National Group” – The bloody battle-ax, like the savage, He swung before Mathilden, Which is attached to him as a wife, (As long as she is not the man!) In the fair union of blonder souls, The Hitler girl can not be missing: Heil Adolf, start your genius! The Jew’s head brought to him for his breakfast! (1928)

“Adolf, a disabled dictator” – I would be just as good as Mussolini – but the authorities will not allow it! (22nd April 1929)

“From the National Socialist picture Bible” – I am the Adolf, your only Hitler, you shall have no (Gregor) Strasser next to me (28th July 1930)

“The Hunt for Happiness” (22nd September 1930)

“Hitler, the Nationalmarxist” – Adolf, Adolf! Give the Sozi’s my theory again” (10th November 1930)

“Tausend – Hitler – Weissenberg” – When a people is abandoned by all the good gods, there must be new gods! (23rd February 1931)

“Party Discipline” – And even if half of the party went to the devil – as long as my half of the horse remains, nothing will happen to me! (21st April 1931)

“The ideal solution: A collective president” – To represent the Wilhelm Hugenberg replacement, presenting the steel Duesterberg, and to play the mechanical loudspeaker and drums, Hitler (13th March 1932)

“The Prussian eagle at the fitting” – ‘ For the spring only the brown shirt, the last scream!’ ‘A very impossible piece of clothing! How should I stir my wings?’ (24th April 1932)

“Hail Prussians!” – In my state, everyone can be saved, only after my fashion (façon)! (15th May 1932)

“Adolf Barbarossa” – And since the evil ravens, still flying forever, so he has to drum, and conjour up many years (21st August 1932)

“Dangerous Condition” – Everyone wants to stick to the constitution – as long as they get it! (25th September 1932)

“Unanimity” – “Why do we actually have 27 parties? The other 26 are superfluous!” (30th October 1932)

“Always his struggle – never for you work and bread” – Away with Hermann! Adolf belongs in the Teutoburg Forest! He succeeded in beating a sixty million people with only 6000 people from Lippe-Detmold! (5th February 1933).

This last one was published less than a week after the Nazi seizure of power, with Hitler appointed the Chancellorship by President von Hindenburg. The illustration refers to ‘Hermann’ in the Teutoburg forest, which is a monument to Arminius, a 1st century Germanic chieftan, who helped to win a famous victory over the Romans in 9AD. The monument was made in 1875, and served as a focal point for the Nazi’s. The artist has depicted Hitler in place of Arminius, who is seen to have achieved a greater feat, by winning a hugely symbolic, if not numerically impressive election victory in the area (Lippe Detmold) that the statue is situated. Goebbels wrote in his diary after a visit to the monument on 12th January “Here we will again win a battle and will then proceed to a new offensive and continue to win victory upon victory. We have overcome our stagnation. Final victory lies ahead.” After January 15th 1933, following the election victory, the Nazis were in a greater position to exert pressure on the cabinet and the President to appoint Hitler as Chancellor. Not long after this publication, apparently the offices of Simplicissimus were visited by stormtroopers, and there were no more critical cartoons of Hitler to appear in the magazine.

Simplicissimus – Benito Mussolini

February 8th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

“Vesuvius Mussolini” – Poor Italy! Again and again you are threatened by volcanic eruptions (1st March 1926)

“Dictatorship Dusk” – Mussolini has forbidden Italians macaroni. Woe to him! (20th September 1926)

“Mussolini the Triumphant” – Only when all my opponents are in prison will I rule over a truly free Italian state (1925)

“Distributed pain is a double pain” – I am sovereign, he is sovereign – so we are both half and half sovereign (3rd June 1929)

“Simple Week” Around Mussolini – (1) Nobody is allowed to laugh about Italy except the eternally blue sky! (2) You photograph me! At least I do not want to spoil it with the Pope. (3) I want the Maccaroni to be sent as a fascia. (4) How did it start with Caligula Professor? (1926)

“Spiritual Advancement” – Benito, Benito – what makes you start a war without my blessing? (30th April 1928)

And it moves – but backwards! (4th March 1929)

“The People” – Processions help against earthquakes – but against Mussolini – -? (1926)

 

Joan of Arc

February 7th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

As seen through the eyes of Schiller, George Bernard Shaw, Frank Wedekind, Hermann Bahr (?), Oscar Wilde and ‘Film’. As illustrated in ‘Simplicissimus’.

August Sander (1876-1964) Landscapes

January 14th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Unica Zürn (1916-1970)

January 12th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Albrecht Durer Roundels

October 18th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

img_3416

img_3410

img_3415

img_3414

Adolph Menzel (1815 – 1905)

October 12th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

voet-vd-artiest

adolph_von_menzel_der_maler_gustav_richter_auf_dem_totenbett_1884

adolph_menzel_-_bauplatz_mit_weiden_-_google_art_project

4b113efdc730b2fac32ef093be0cabec

adolph_menzel_-_das_balkonzimmer_-_google_art_project

menzel_adolph_von_-_the_studio_wall_-_1872

Josef Albers (1888 – 1976)

May 4th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

80244

07109_01-ic (1)

drawings_13

Josef-Albers-504x397

josef-albers-ink-drawing-for-eic-3

1977.43

SC_05

12_JA_prints_124

3-Albers_GraphicTectonic

tumblr_n81gtkuyr51qb0z6go1_500

 

Anni Albers (1899 – 1994)

May 4th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

fabrics_09

wallhangings_14

wallhangings_13

Book Review – “A Seventh Man” John Berger & Jean Mohr (1975)

March 7th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

a seventh man

YES.

When I was a boy and living in Germany, I played football for the local village team. It was a mixture of Germans and British sons of RAF parents. Over the 4-5 years of playing for them, we would often play teams who had a few ‘Turkish’ kids in their team. These were likely 2nd generation immigrants, the sons of some of the people that this book talks about. The few immigrants seeking work who were able to stay in Germany and bring/have their family there.

I do remember being told on more than one occasion (though the way childhood memory works, who can be sure?) by team mates, both British and German, that the Turks were ‘cheats’, ‘dirty’ and ‘smelly’. I can see in my minds eye the German boys holding their noses so I could fully understand.

The one distinctive memory I actually have of playing against a Turkish boy was during a game on a very hot summers day. A lot of the pitches we played on weren’t grass, but a kind of terracotta dust. It would kick up and get in your eyes, and if you did a sliding tackle it would leave a huge dirty mark along your leg like a hakeme brush. When I sweated, the drips down my forehead would collect the dust and create little trails down my face.

This boy (we were probably 9 or 10 years old) had tiny feet which made the ball look even bigger than it was, but he had incredible control, and could do Cruyff turns. He was very short but strong and had a big arse. His hair was thick and dark and curly and I couldn’t get the ball off him. I can picture him running around me and away as I desperately tried to grab his shirt, and lunged into a sliding tackle that got nowhere near him or the ball.

Mesut Özil was born in Gelsenkirchen in October 1988, a 3rd generation Turkish-German (“My technique and feeling for the ball is the Turkish side to my game. The discipline, attitude and always-give-your-all is the German part”), around the time I was in Germany (1986 – 1991). Gelsenkirchen was around 60 miles from where we lived, and in the 70’s many Turks made their way to this part of Western Germany to work in the then numerous factories.

Özil is my favourite footballer. There is a strange beauty in the way his body moves, the balance and grace and the certainty of movement. When he passes the ball he never overhits it, or underhits it – it is perfectly struck to allow the receiving player to take the ball without breaking stride. He can shape his body to make it appear he is about to do something else, without it being a showy dance like Ronaldo. What I really like is that he sees where other players are on the pitch, and can put the ball in the right place at the right time. I think at Arsenal it probably took the other players a season or so to realise that they could make unusual runs, and that they would be seen – to trust in Özil’s ability to find them. By having this ability, he creates unusual patterns on the pitch, of movement of players and the ball. He creates and that’s why I like him.

This book, like all of Berger’s, is sensitive and empathetic and generous. It’s specific subject matter (generally male workers from Portugal, Turkey and Greece moving to France and Germany) may be a little out of date, but the overarching theme of the trials and stresses and strains of being an immigrant is clearly relevant now. There is no real mention of refugees as such, or women and children, but if you want to try to understand what an immigrant may have to deal with when coming to a new country, you should read this book.

"The Seventh (A hetedik)" - Attila Jozsef (1905 - 1937)
If you set out in this world,
better be born seven times.
Once, in a house on fire,
once, in a freezing flood,
once, in a wild madhouse,
once, in a field of ripe wheat,
once, in an empty cloister,
and once among pigs in sty.
Six babes crying, not enough:
you yourself must be the seventh.

When you must fight to survive,
let your enemy see seven.
One, away from work on Sunday,
one, starting his work on Monday,
one, who teaches without payment,
one, who learned to swim by drowning,
one, who is the seed of a forest,
and one, whom wild forefathers protect,
but all their tricks are not enough:
you yourself must be the seventh.

If you want to find a woman,
let seven men go for her.
One, who gives heart for words,
one, who takes care of himself,
one, who claims to be a dreamer,
one, who through her skirt can feel her,
one, who knows the hooks and snaps,
one, who steps upon her scarf:
let them buzz like flies around her.
You yourself must be the seventh.

If you write and can afford it,
let seven men write your poem.
One, who builds a marble village,
one, who was born in his sleep,
one, who charts the sky and knows it,
one, whom words call by his name,
one, who perfected his soul,
one, who dissects living rats.
Two are brave and four are wise;
You yourself must be the seventh.

And if all went as was written,
you will die for seven men.
One, who is rocked and suckled,
one, who grabs a hard young breast,
one, who throws down empty dishes,
one, who helps the poor win;
one, who worked till he goes to pieces,
one, who just stares at the moon.
The world will be your tombstone:
you yourself must be the seventh.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Germany category at The Curse & The Cure.